Rani ka Vav, Patan

One of the rare monuments erected by a queen for her beloved king, Rani Ka Vav is a spectacular step well in very well preserved condition. It was commissioned by Rani Udayamati in memory of her deceased husband King Bhimdev I in the year 1063.

Soon after completion, the step well got flooded by water and silt from the nearby Saraswati River. It was only in 1980s that the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) excavated this Vav and desilting was undertaken.

The structure that was uncovered was a majestic specimen of carved sculptures, niches and compartmented pavilions with pillars. Rani ka Vav is one of the largest and finest and unique step wells and is currently in the tentative list of UNESCO World Heritage Site.

This subterranean step well leads down through stepped corridors which are marked by pillared pavilions. The central motif of the intricately carved sculptures is the Dasavataras, or the 10 incarnations of Hindu god Vishnu. The avatars are accompanied by sadhus, brahmins, and apsaras.

The sculpture of apsaras painting their lips and adorning themselves in different style represents the ‘solah shringar' or the 16 ways to make up to look more attractive. In total there are four hundred niches on the walls displaying carvings in this vav.